Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Founded in 1979, Solar Oregon is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit membership organization providing public education and community outreach to encourage Oregonians to choose solar energy.
Sections
You are here: Home News "Solar project hopes to double efforts in Portland"

"Solar project hopes to double efforts in Portland"

PORTLAND - Volunteers are changing the mindset of hundreds of homeowners about the value going solar in Northeast Portland neighborhoods. The Solarize Northeast Project is the leader in Oregon when it comes to giving solar power to the people, with even bigger goals this year.

"Solar project hopes to double efforts in Portland"

Solar Ambassador Jack Simons home in Pendleton OR

By Joe Smith
KGW News
>>click here for original article

PORTLAND - Volunteers are changing the mindset of hundreds of homeowners about the value going solar in Northeast Portland neighborhoods.

The Solarize Northeast Project is the leader in Oregon when it comes to giving solar power to the people, with even bigger goals this year.

"In Multnomah County, more than half of our electricity is from burning coal,which we know has a devastating effect on the climate," said David Sweet, an early adopter of solar power.

David Sweet is a Solar Oregon Solar Ambassador! Check out his page and other Solar Ambassadors across the state!

Sweet saves more than $300 a year and gives back to the grid most days.

In 2010 the volunteer-based Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods (NECN) led the charge of the Solarize NE Project. More than 200 panel installations were added around the community.

"This year we're hoping to surpass that by at least double," said Paige Coleman, Executive Dir. for NECN .

It's a neighbor to neighbor effort, working with local banks, panel maker Solar World and a local installer. Strength in numbers has it's benefits.   

Check out SolarWorld's Solar Oregon Professional page here!

The community comes together, gets a great price, we simplify the process, (finding out) what contractor should I use, what equipment should I buy, how much is it going to cost?," said Sweet.

Some 80 percent of the installation cost is covered though several incentive programs, including up to $5,000 from the Energy Trust of Oregon.

"There's a 30 percent federal tax credit, and then there is a tax credit offered by the state, which caps out at about $6,000," said Pete Edling with installation company, Mr. Sun Solar.

Check out Mr. Sun Solar's Solar Oregon Professional page here!

Out of pocket expenses usually run $2,000 to $4,000, with an average savings of some $300 a year. 

To find out more, there are several upcoming free workshops to help explain the solar power process.

Click here for more information from the Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods.

 
Personal tools
powered by Plone | site by Groundwire Consulting and served with clean energy